Online Psychology Degree

B.A. Psychology

Online Psychology Degree

The School of Arts & Sciences’ online psychology degree introduces you to the broad spectrum of theories used in understanding human behavior. The program provides a well-rounded education in the discipline, with the opportunity to tailor the curriculum to meet your individual needs.

Graduates are prepared for advanced study in psychology and related disciplines, as well as employment in professional entry-level positions in human service settings and mental health facilities. A psychology major is also an excellent way to prepare for a career in law, business, human resources management, advertising and sales.

Psychology courses explore:

  • Research methods
  • The psychology of learning
  • Individual differences and social processes
  • Biological bases of behaviors
  • Developmental psychology
  • Diversity
  • Forensic psychology
  • Military psychology
  • Industrial and organizational psychology
  • Interviewing and counseling

Psychology majors are encouraged to become involved in research and complete a field practicum or internship.

In addition to the theories and practices necessary to understand human behaviors, the online psychology degree program emphasizes leadership skills within Saint Leo University‘s core values and traditions.


Degree Requirements

General Education Core (48 credits)

  • Course
  • Course Name
  • Credits
  • SLU 101 SLU Strategies for Success (0 Credits)

    SLU Strategies is a non-credit course with no charge for tuition. There is an instructor for the course. SLU Strategies is required of all new online students. This course introduces and orients students to online academic life, preparing them to be active, independent learners and thinkers. University policies and procedures are also reviewed.

  • MAT 131 College Mathematics (3 Credits)

    Topics include number theory, numeration systems, geometry, counting methods, probability, and statistics.

    Prerequisites: Mathematics Placement

  • ENG 121 Academic Writing I (3 Credits)

    The techniques of effective writing, logical thinking and intelligent reading, with special emphasis on expository writing.

    Prerequisites: Passing grade in ENG 002 or satisfactory score on the English Placement Test

  • ENG 122  Academic Writing II (3 Credits)

    A continuation of ENG 121. Expository writing based on analytical study of literary genres.

    Prerequisites: ENG 121

  • COM 140 Business Computer Skills (3 Credits)

    Required for all business majors. Students will use commercial software packages in the microcomputer laboratory to gain an advanced understanding of business functions of computers and to develop personal competency in practical applications of microcomputers for business. Provides business students with the specific knowledge and capabilities in various computer skills necessary to be effective in both business classes and the business world. Course fee may apply.

  • FAS 101 The Integrated Arts (3 Credits)

    This is an interdisciplinary course that introduces students to visual, written, and musical works of art designed to increase the student’s understanding and aesthetic pleasure as well as to develop acquaintance with techniques and terminology in the arts. Regular classroom lectures/discussions may be complemented by live or virtual performances and exhibits as appropriate to the course format to enhance the student’s experience of the arts.

  • Aesthetic Perspective Options: (3 Credits)
    • ART 123 Art Appreciation

      Basic terms, theories and techniques of the artist; major art movements; media in the visual arts.

      Prerequisites: FAS 101

    • ENG 202 Creative Writing

      Introduction to the creative process, analyzing creative writing in various genres, and the study of master writers. Offered annually.

      Prerequisites: ENG 122 and FAS 101

    • FAS 123 Introduction to Film

      A survey course treating film as a modern art form. Includes thematic content and aesthetic problems that face film theoreticians.

      Prerequisites: FAS 101

    • FAS 125 Introduction to Theatre

      Investigates the imaginative processes involved in creating theatre. Emphasizes the dramatic event, dramatic literature in performance. Examines the roles of audience, actor, playwright, director, and others who collaborate to create the theater experience.

      Prerequisites: FAS 101

    • MUS 123 Introduction to Music

      Develops an understanding of, and appreciation for, the most important composers and styles from music history and develops critical and intelligent listening skills.

      Prerequisites: FAS 101

  • Core English Options: (3 Credits)
    • ENG 225 Survey of World Literature I

      Designed to introduce non-English majors to world literature in translation, from ancient civilizations through the 17th century. Continued emphasis on literary devices writers use and on expository  writing based on analytical study of the literature of the course. Offered annually.

      Prerequisites: ENG 122 and ART 123, ENG 202, FAS 123, FAS 125, or MUS 123

    • ENG 226 Survey of World Literature II

      Designed to introduce non-English majors to the world literature in translation from the 18th century through the 20th century. Continued emphasis on literary devices writers use and on expository writing based on analytical study of the literature of the course.

      Prerequisites: ENG 122

    • ENG 311 Survey of Major Writers of the 20th Century

      A study for non-English majors of the most significant and influential movements of the twentieth century as those movements have shaped the course of human experience. Provides an opportunity for students to discuss and analyze a broad range of writers from several countries, drawing on cultural and ethnic issues particularly relevant to those writers.

      Prerequisites: ENG 122

  • SSC 102 The Global Perspective 3

    A survey of various global issues arising in the world since World War II. The course combines the disciplines of history, political science, and economics. Emphasis will be placed on the interaction of the superpowers during the Cold War, the post-colonial emergence of the Third World, the ascendancy of regional and international economic and political institutions, the ambiguous blessing of technological innovation, and the reshaping of contemporary Europe.

  • Global Perspective Options: (3 Credits)
    • ECO 201 Principles of Macroeconomics

      An introduction to the study of the determination of income, output, employment and prices in the U.S. economy. Emphasis on fundamental economic concepts, gross domestic product and its components, monetary and fiscal policy, and contemporary macroeconomic issues.

      Prerequisites: SSC 102

    • HTY 121 United States History to 1865

      A survey of the principal movements, events, ideas, and personalities in U.S. history from colonial times to the Civil War. Offered annually.

      Prerequisites: SSC 102

    • HTY 122 United States History Since 1865

      A survey of the principal movements, events, ideas, and personalities in U.S. history from the Civil War to the present. Offered annually.

      Prerequisites: SSC 102

    • POL 223 American Federal Government

      An introduction to the basic principles and processes of American national government, including federalism, representation, separation of powers, checks and balances, the committee system, the electoral college, political parties, and judicial review. Emphasis is placed on understanding the Constitution and the intention of the framers, although modern developments and contemporary policy  issues are not neglected. Offered annually.

      Prerequisites: SSC 102

  • SSC 101 The Human Behavior Perspective (3 Credits)

    An interdisciplinary course designed to provide students with the opportunity to consider the many ways in which human beings function as individuals, as members of larger groups and demographic segments, and as members of a particular culture. This course explores the disciplines of sociology, psychology, and anthropology within the framework of the scientific method, social constructivism, ethics, and values. Value systems, including the core values of Saint Leo University, and the ways in which they affect social structure are also explored.

  • PHI 101 The Quest for Wisdom (3 Credits)

    The course examines human beings as present to themselves, as having a narrative self-understanding, and as being on a quest for meaning and orientation in life. Some of the topics are: the mystery of existence; thinking and prejudice; the good, conscience, and the power of choice; the state and the dignity of the person; the problem of materialism and scientism; and the place of imagination in articulating life’s meaning.

  • Human Behavior Perspective Options: (3 Credits)
    • ANT 101 Introduction to Anthropology

      An examination of human, physical, and cultural development using evidence from archaeology, paleontology, genetics, ecology, cultural anthropology, and linguistics with emphasis on the historical, structural, and symbolic aspects of human culture.

      Prerequisites: SSC 101

    • PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology

      A survey of the major areas in psychology. Principal topics covered are: physiological bases of behavior, personality, mental disorders and treatment, social influences and other basic issues. The course introduces students to the broad spectrum of theories used in understanding human behavior.

      Prerequisites: SSC 101

    • SOC 121 Introduction to Sociology

      A survey of the major issues and ideas in sociology, including basic concepts and theories, as well as an examination of major social institutions, the dynamics and processes of social interaction, and the structure and organization of social groups.

      Prerequisites: SSC 101

  • Core Religion Options: (3 Credits)
    • REL 123 Foundations of Christian Faith

      This course involves an introduction to the field of theology as an academic discipline with a body of writing, methods, and interpretations. It is concerned with how to successfully study theology, including basic library research methodology and critical thinking. Students will build a basic understanding of the whole of theology through an introduction of its parts: Old Testament and New Testament Literature, Who Is Jesus?, What Is the Church?, Grace and the Sacraments, Christian Morality, Social Justice, Judaism and the Church, the Islamic Religion and the Church, and Catholic Theology in a Global Context.

      Prerequisites: PHI 101

    • REL 124 Introduction to the Old Testament

      A basic introduction to the literature and theology of the Jewish Scriptures.

      Prerequisites: PHI 101

    • REL 201 Introduction to the New Testament

      A basic introduction to the literature and theology of the New Testament, including exposure to critical methods such as form and redaction criticisms.

      Prerequisites: PHI 101

    • REL 223 Religions of the World I: Western Religions

      A study of Western religions, including religions of non-literate societies and ancient religions, Judaism, Christianity and Islam.

      Prerequisites: PHI 101

  • Any 300 or 400 level Religion course (3 Credits)
  • SCI 101 Integrated Physical Science (3 Credits)

    This course is designed to provide integrated knowledge and basic understanding of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, historical trends, and empirical findings of the physical sciences, including physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, oceanography, atmospheric sciences, and earth sciences. Major integrated themes include the nature and history of the universe, the solar system, and the Earth; the four forces; the ultimate structure and development of matter; types and nature of chemical bonding; plate tectonics; the rock cycle; biogeochemical cycles; oceanic and atmospheric circulation; global climate change; the unified nature of the laws and forces of the universe; the scientific world view; the scientific method; and the major differences between the scientific way of knowing and other ways of knowing. Emphasis is placed on oral and written scientific literacy through effective interpretation and communication of written, quantitative, graphic, and tabular scientific information.

  • SCI 102 Integrated Life Science (3 Credits)

    This course is designed to introduce non-science majors to the concepts and practical applications of the life sciences so that students will be informed citizens in an increasingly science and technology based society. Specific themes focused on will include cell structure and function, cell reproduction, DNA, genetic engineering, evolution, the origins of life, and the environment. Ethical and moral considerations will be discussed where appropriate. There will be several demonstrations and/or student experiments during the semester. This is the second of two integrated science courses required of all non-science majors. This course requires substantial writing and reading.

    Recommended Prerequisite: SCI 101 strongly recommended

Psychology Core (39 credits)

  • Course
  • Course Name
  • Credits
  • PSY intro *: (3 Credits)
    • PSY 121 Introduction to Psychology

      A survey of the major areas in psychology. Principal topics covered are: physiological bases of behavior, personality, mental disorders and treatment, social influences and other basic issues. The course introduces students to the broad spectrum of theories used in understanding human behavior.

      Prerequisites: SSC 101

    • PSY 161 Fundamentals of Psychology **

      This introductory course in psychology is designed for students who are majoring in psychology and represents a survey of the core areas in psychology including the physiological bases of behavior, cognition and learning, motivation and emotion, personality and social influences, and mental disorders and their treatment among other major areas of the field. Students are exposed to the broad spectrum of theories used in understanding human behavior and mental processes and learn foundational knowledge necessary for students to excel in the psychology major.

      Prerequisite: Declared major in psychology.

  • PSY 201 The Psychology Major: Academic and Professional Issues (3 Credits)

    This course is a required three-credit course that was designed to be completed during the freshman or sophomore year. The course addresses the practical skills and knowledge needed by majors to successfully complete their psychology degree. Course content includes such topics as the scientific inquiry process in psychology, introduction to internet and literature searches, American Psychological Association writing format, introduction to software used by psychologists, preparing the resume, and conducting a successful job search or application process to graduate school.

    Prerequisites: PSY 121

  • PSY 205 Research Methods I (3 Credits)

    The first of two courses in understanding research methods in psychology and the statistical techniques that are used to analyze psychological data. The course will focus on ethical research practice, reviewing the psychological literature, basic non-experimental research designs (observation, relational research), and descriptive and correlational statistical analyses. Students will gain experience in reading, researching, proposing, conducting, analyzing, interpreting, and reporting scientific research.

    Prerequisites: PSY 121, MAT 128 or MAT 131 completed or taken concurrently

  • PSY 305 Research Methods II (3 Credits)

    A continued examination of research methods in psychology, with emphasis on experimental design and inferential statistical analysis. Students will enhance their experience in researching, reading, proposing, conducting, analyzing, interpreting, and reporting scientific research.

    Prerequisites: PSY 205

  • PSY 496 Comprehensive Psychology Examination (0 Credits)

    Final comprehensive written examination for students majoring in psychology. Examination is administered in the PSY 499: Senior Seminar in Psychology course. Test fee. Offered annually.

    Prerequisites: PSY 499

  • PSY 499 Senior Seminar in Psychology (3 Credits)

    Designed as the capstone course in psychology, this course is a review of the evolution of the history and major systems of psychology including behaviorism, Gestalt psychology, psychoanalysis, and the humanistic and cognitive movements. The course develops in students a basic understanding of the development of psychology as an independent discipline. It helps students to develop an historical context that will help them to better understand the diverse people, ideas, and schools of thought that have shaped psychology through the ages.

    Prerequisites: Senior standing in Psychology with a minimum of six Psychology courses including PSY 305.
    Corequisite: PSY 496.

  • Learning Domain (take one course): (3 Credits)
    • PSY 412 Cognitive Psychology

      An examination of higher-level thought processes including such topics as attention and perception, memory, language, reasoning, concept formation, and problem solving. Theories of cognitive functions are examined with an emphasis on research findings and methodologies.

      Prerequisites: PSY 305 completed or taken concurrently

    • PSY 422 Psychology of Learning

      The structure and function of the central nervous system as related to emotion, motivation, learning, and theory of brain functions. Offered in alternate years.

      Prerequisites: PSY 121

  • Individual Differences and Social Processes Domain (take one course): (3 Credits)
    • PSY 328 Social Psychology

      A study of the perceptions, attitudes, personality, motivations, relationships, and behavior of the individual as a function of social situations. THe course emphasizes theory, research, and application. It is a course that is highly desirable for students in Social Work, Education, Pre-Law, Pre-Med, Pre-Nursing, Public Administration, Marketing, and Management.

      Prerequisites: PSY 121 and PSY 205

    • PSY 427 Personality Theory

      A review of the major historical and contemporary personality theories that attempt to explain and describe human behavior. Offered annually.

      Prerequisites: PSY 121 and junior standing

  • Biological Bases of Behavior Domain (take one course): (3 Credits)
    • PSY 322 Physiological Psychology

      The structure and function of the central nervous system as related to emotion, motivation, learning, and theory of brain functions.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

    • PSY 432 Psychology of Motivation

      A review of the major theories that attempt to explain motivated behavior from a physiological, cognitive, social, environmental, and/or learning point of view. Offered as needed.

      Prerequisite: PSY 205

    • PSY 433 Sensation and Perception

      A study of sensory and perceptual phenomena, including all basic sensory systems and such topics as pain perceptions, illusions, and hallucinations, sensory deprivation, color vision and color blindness, deafness, sensory-motor development, and altered states of consciousness. Offered in alternate years.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

  • Developmental Domain (take one course): (3 Credits)
    • PSY 325 Developmental Psychology

      A survey of the major areas in human development with an equal emphasis placed on child, adolescent, and adult development. Examines developmental changes over the course of development and the processes underlying these changes. All major areas are reviewed, including biological, cognitive, language, personality, emotional, moral, social, and career development.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

    • PSY 332 Psychology of Aging

      The purpose of this course is to provide an orientation to aging processes in adulthood and later life. Students will be introduced to basic theoretical models, research methods, and current information on the psychology of adulthood and aging and shown how these concepts can be applied to understanding and helping older adults. An emphasis is placed on strategies for successful aging.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

    • PSY 334 Child and Adolescent Development

      A survey of the major areas in human development with an emphasis placed on child and adolescent development. The course examines developmental changes from conception to adolescence and the processes underlying these changes. All major areas are reviewed, including biological, cognitive, language, personality, emotional, moral, and social development.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

  • Diversity Domain (take one course): (3 Credits)
    • SSC 101 The Human Behavior Perspective

      An interdisciplinary course designed to provide students with the opportunity to consider the many ways in which human beings function as individuals, as members of larger groups and demographic segments, and as members of a particular culture. This course explores the disciplines of sociology, psychology, and anthropology within the framework of the scientific method, social constructivism, ethics, and values. Value systems, including the core values of Saint Leo University, and the ways in which they affect social structure are also explored.

    • SSC 322 Race and Ethnicity in American Culture

      An analysis of the historical development of the principal racial and ethnic groups in American society, with emphasis on minorities, such as African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans. Offered fall semester.

      Prerequisite: SOC 121 (R,T)

    • PSY 339 Social and Cultural Foundations of Behavior

      This course explores social and cultural issues in psychology as they relate to the application of psychological theories and principles to diverse groups. Special attention is given to racial/ethnic minority issues and cultural diversity, a key component of which is developing an understanding of personal cultural development and how this pattern of development influences perceptions of interactions with others and general human behavior.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

  • Applied Domain (take one course) : (3 Credits)
    • PSY 327 Abnormal Psychology

      This course offers a review of the historical and current scientific approaches to the study of abnormal behavior, emphasizing theories of causation, symptomatology, and treatment. Emphasis is on the DSM classification.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

    • PSY 330 Forensic Psychology

      Forensic psychology is the application of the science and profession of psychology to questions and issues relating to law and the legal system. This course will introduce students to the specialty area of forensic psychology. Particular emphasis will be on the applied aspects of the field.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

    • PSY 331 Interviewing and Counseling Skills

      This course provides students with a basic framework of skills in the area of interpersonal communication for use in clinical settings and in a wide spectrum of human service settings.

      Prerequisites: PSY 121 and sophomore standing

    • PSY 336 Military Psychology

      This course provides a survey of the major areas in military psychology. Principal topics covered are leadership training, persuasion and propaganda, human factors engineering, selection, classification and assignment, optimizing human performance under adverse conditions, ethnic diversity and gender issues, clinical and consulting activities, and careers in military psychology. The course introduces the student to the application of psychological principles, theories, and methods to the military environment. Offered as needed.

      Prerequisite: PSY 336

    • PSY 338 Industrial and Organizational Psychology

      This course examines both sides of industrial and organizational psychology to include an overview of legal issues in employee selection, job analysis, research design, selection tools, performance evaluation, designing and evaluating training, employee motivation and satisfaction, as well as leadership and other organizational development issues.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

    • PSY 305 Research Methods II

      A continued examination of research methods in psychology, with emphasis on experimental design and inferential statistical analysis. Students will enhance their experience in researching, reading, proposing, conducting, analyzing, interpreting, and reporting scientific research.

      Prerequisite: PSY 205

    • PSY 423 Educational Psychology

      Understanding the applications of psychological principles to the educational process. Offered as needed.

      Prerequisite: PSY 121

  •         Two upper-level (300- or 400-level) psychology courses (6 credits)

Electives (33 Credits)

Total Semester Credits 120

  1. * Either PSY 121 or PSY 161 may satisfy a LINK requirement
  2. ** Preferred
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