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Things to Consider with the Military Tuition Assistance Cuts

In light of the recent cuts to the military tuition assistance sequester cuts, our military men and women no doubt have questions as to what options are still left for their education.

Photo: blogs.dctc.edu

Photo: blogs.dctc.edu

  • First off, these cuts will only effect those signing up for tuition assistance for the first time. Service members currently enrolled in courses approved for tuition assistance are not affected and are allowed to complete their current courses.
  • These spending cuts are not set for a specific amount of time but will be re-evaluated if the budgetary situation improves.

To make it through the cuts, make use of tuition assistance resources.
While, tuition Assistance has been a key benefit paid to eligible service members, there are other options for financial assistance.

  • Apply for federal student aid through the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
  • Apply for scholarships
  • Use your VA benefits: Veterans, as well as active service members, may continue to pursue their educational goals with VA education benefits, if applicable, that include: the Montgomery GI Bill-Active Duty (Chapter 30), Montgomery GI Bill-Selected Reserve (Chapter 1606), Reserve Education Assistance Program (Chapter 1607), and The Post 9/11 GI Bill.

 

For more information, visit Saint Leo’s Blog

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One year since the repeal of DADT

On September 20, 2011, one year ago yesterday, the US military’s ‘Don’t ask, don’t tell’ (DADT) policy towards gays, lesbians and bisexuals serving openly was repealed.

The rights of gays, lesbians and bisexuals is a hot topic for many.  There is some support that DADT negatively impacted the psychological well-being of our military men and women increasing the number of stressors that are risk factors for mental illness. And compromised mental health is not only problematic for the individual, it also threatens the broader military mission because wars are not fought by individuals acting alone, they are fought by highly interdependent groups of soldiers. Research conducted in the general population suggests that this additional psychological burden may put gay, lesbian, and bisexual soldiers at greater risk for mental health problems which, again, could compromise our military’s ability to function at its best.  So, the repeal of DADT may have improve the mental health of some of its service men and women thus making the US military able to function better as a whole.  Even DADT specific research that examined the effects felt after the appeal showed that there are no detrimental effects regarding the repeal.

No matter what side of the fence you are on in regards to the gay rights movement, it is tough to deny the impact that the repeal of DADT has had on the lives of our military men and women who now don’t have to hide such a huge part of their life.   The Huffington Post has a slide show displaying the 25 most memorable moments since DADT was repealed and is a touching tribute to all the milestones achieved in the past year.

Photo: huffingtonpost.com

Sources: Huffingtonpost.com

 Psychologytoday.com

Dr. Shannon Farris featured in Military Advanced Education Journal

Virtual Integrity

Do online courses pose a greater risk to academic honor codes? (more…)

Yvette Taylor has been iNKED!

Yvette Taylor
Senior, University Campus

Hello,

My name is Yvette Taylor and I am a student at Saint Leo University.  I am a divorced parent, raising three of my four daughters and a Desert Storm veteran.  At the age of 20 I left college and joined the US Air Force.  Fifteen years and four daughters later, I decided to return to college.  How could I tell my daughters that they had to go to college when I was not willing to finish it myself?  I was taught in the Air Force that you do not ask anyone to do anything that you are not willing to do.

In the summer of 2006, I returned to college part-time while working a full-time job.  In 2008, I was laid off my job of eleven years, and decided to go back to college full-time.  I graduated with honors from Pasco-Hernando Community College in December of 2009.  I remember praying that I would get into Saint Leo because of the prestigious reputation that the school has and I thought that it would look better on my resume’ than some of the other colleges in the area. The excitement I felt when I got my acceptance letter cannot be put into words.  I bought a shirt for every member of my family; I wanted the world to know that I am student at Saint Leo University.  Everyday that I walk the campus is like a dream for me.

This semester has been very hard for me because I have class until 6:10pm on Tuesdays.  This class really disrupts my family’s schedule because my youngest daughter has to be picked up by 3pm and my twin daughters have basketball practice every day until 5pm.  Along with these problems I am taking a class that is requires a lot of extra outside work in Dr. Farris’ class.  So I have had to bring my daughters to seminars so that I could earn extra credit in the class.

For the most part my daughters have been very supportive of me.  One day I came home complaining about the work load of this class, my oldest twin look at me and said

Mom if you had finished school when you were suppose to then you wouldn’t have this problem.  

I wanted to be mad at her, but she was right, so the mother in me took over.  My reply to her was “your right, so when you go to college remember how my going back to college later disrupted your life.  Do what you are supposed to do while you are there.”

My daughters are what really keep me going. If I want them to get a college degree, then I need to set the example. It is so funny to me that even on my worst day at school I have not ever considered quitting. And as hard as this class is for me, I haven’t ever considered not going to Grad school.  On the days when I feel discouraged, I look around at the campus and appreciate being a Saint Leo student, and tell myself,

Anything worth having is worth working hard for! Thank you Saint Leo!

                                            Graduation 2009 PHCC Yvette, daughters & nephew.

Have a positive Saint Leo story to tell? Email shannon.farris@saintleo.edu for details.

Saint Leo University

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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